Anatomy of a password disaster - Adobe's giant-sized cryptographic blunder

The myth of NASA's expensive space pens

I’ve been thinking a lot about the NSA’s global electronic surveillance.

Say what you will about erosion of civil liberties, you have to admit, we live in the mother fucking future.

Tuesday, August 27, 2013 — 1 note

Bret Victor - Inventing on Principle

i enjoyed this

As a security and privacy expert, I’m expected to know which companies protect their users’ privacy and which encryption programs the NSA can’t break. The truth is, I have no idea. No one outside the classified government world does. I tell people that they have no choice but to decide whom they trust and to then trust them as a matter of faith. It’s a lousy answer, but until our government starts down the path of regaining our trust, it’s the only thing we can do.

In my experience, telling people to do something hard (open source, keep privacy, etc.) in the face of a barely perceived danger (government is coming to get you) is kind of a hard message to get heard.

bmelton, in a HN discussion on getting users to adopt more secure practices 

I’m shocked that more hackers don’t send Dropbox invitations sharing folders that contain malicious files.

It’s such an incredible vector to get people to automatically download a ton of files to take advantage of zero day flaws in Windows Explorer.

"Your Mom has shared a folder ‘Amazing Kitten Pictures’ with you." and BOOM! p0wn2d!

Friday, May 31, 2013 — 2 notes

Name: Isaac Newton (1642-1727)Writes: RightDominant Cortex: Left University: Cambridge UniversityKey Contributions: ”In Book I of Principia, Newton opened with definitions and the three laws of motion now known as Newton’s laws (laws of inertia, action and reaction, and acceleration proportional to force). Book II presented Newton’s new scientific philosophy which came to replace Cartesianism. Finally, Book III consisted of applications of his dynamics, including an explanation for tides and a theory of lunar motion.”

via Famous Scientists on Famous Baseball Cards

Name: Isaac Newton (1642-1727)
Writes: Right
Dominant Cortex: Left 
University: Cambridge University
Key Contributions: ”In Book I of Principia, Newton opened with definitions and the three laws of motion now known as Newton’s laws (laws of inertia, action and reaction, and acceleration proportional to force). Book II presented Newton’s new scientific philosophy which came to replace Cartesianism. Finally, Book III consisted of applications of his dynamics, including an explanation for tides and a theory of lunar motion.”

via Famous Scientists on Famous Baseball Cards

Everything announced at the Google I/O 2013 keynote in one handy list

(Source: 9-bits)

This is like asserting that my former hometown of Washington, D.C., has several football teams: the Redskins, the Georgetown University team, and the Gonzaga High School team.

Susan Crawford, on contentions by AT&T and T-Mobile that local wireless markets are competitive

You should have distinct memories of you or someone under your employ having at least two separate incidents in the last four weeks in which they dropped everything they were doing and immediately took action to resolve these problems.

I Thought It Was a Series of Tubes…

Last night during the hurricane, we could not telnet to one of our partner’s data centers from our primary data center. We could get there from our workstations and from our backup sites.

A traceroute revealed a router somewhere in Washington DC that was hanging things up between the two data centers. 

So my question is, how could this happen? I would have expected all the TCP/IP packets to be rerouted automatically around the malfunctioning router? Isn’t that the way the Internet was designed to work?

Tuesday, October 30, 2012 — 1 note

Hurricane Preparedness for Nerds

Everyone on our production support team installed the following cron on their local workstation so we would know if anyone loses power and can’t get in touch with the rest of the team:

*/1 * * * * ssh server "echo '`date` `whoami` reporting for duty' >> sandy.log"
Monday, October 29, 2012
Love the new Slashdot logo.
I also love the neckbeard comments about how that wouldn’t actually be an accurate little endian representation “even on 24 bit machines”

Love the new Slashdot logo.

I also love the neckbeard comments about how that wouldn’t actually be an accurate little endian representation “even on 24 bit machines”

This is such a useful little feature for the new version of Skitch.
Update: The app store reviews of Skitch 2.0 are scathing. I’m not upgrading yet.

This is such a useful little feature for the new version of Skitch.

Update: The app store reviews of Skitch 2.0 are scathing. I’m not upgrading yet.